Gentle Foot Care Blog

Posts for: July, 2018

July 17, 2018
Category: Uncategorized

While conditions such as arthritis, tendonitis, and nerve impingements can cause heel pain, the most common cause is plantar fasciitis.  Plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of the connective tissue on the bottom of the foot.  Poor biomechanics, lack of supportive footwear, obesity, and overuse contribute to the condition.  The pain is typically worse in the morning upon first rising.  Pain may present on the bottom of the heel and radiate to the arch, or in the arch alone.  Plantar fasciitis typically worsens over time.  As with most conditions, the longer one has the issue, the longer it may take to recover.

The best course of treatment uses a multi-modal approach.  Henderson Podiatry offers an array of options consisting of:  prescribing a day and night splint for support and stretch, stretching exercises to relieve tension, steroid injections to reduce inflammation, supportive footwear and orthotics to promote proper gait mechanics, and following the R.I.C.E. guidelines (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation).  Other treatment options include:  laser therapy, physical therapy, and surgery. 

Reduce your risk for developing or preventing a recurrence of plantar fasciitis.  Be sure to stretch after exercising and be careful not to over train.  Wear supportive footwear that does not bend or twist easily.  Invest in a good pair of custom orthotics, especially if you work on your feet a lot.  If you are experiencing any kind of foot pain that is impacting your daily life, call our office today.


July 03, 2018
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

An ingrown toenail, also known as onychocryptosis, occurs when a corner or side of the nail grows into the skin of the toe.  This may cause redness, swelling, pain, and possible infection.  An ingrown nail is most common, but not limited to, the big toe.  The nail may become ingrown on either or both sides of the toe.  As with any foot concern, those with weakened immune systems, poor circulation, or diabetes are at greater risk for developing an infection.

Ingrown nails may result from trimming the nails too short or too curved.  Toenails should grow to the tip of the toe and be cut straight across.  Footwear that is particularly constraining to the toes, may also put excessive pressure on the nails and cause them to be ingrown.  An injury to the nail itself can cause an ingrown nail.

Left untreated an infection can arise and in severe cases spread to the bone.  Home remedies include:  soaking, lifting the nail with a small piece of cotton, applying antibiotic ointment, and taking oral pain relievers.  When home remedies don’t correct the issue, it’s time to call the Podiatrist.  An ingrown nail can be treated in the office as a minimally invasive procedure.  The toe will be injected with a numbing agent.  The nail will be partially or fully removed, and a chemical mixture may be applied to prevent regrowth.  In cases of partial removal, once healed, the skin will grow back up to the new nail border and look like a normal nail.  It is imperative to follow any after care instructions given and if prescribed an oral antibiotic, be sure to take all the allotted doses.

If you have an ingrown nail and experience any signs of an infection (fever, chills, nausea, discharge from the area, red streaking from the affected area, or the area is warm to the touch), call our office to schedule an appointment immediately.  It’s best to treat the infection right away, rather then let it develop and spread to other areas of the body.