Children's Shoes

Ingrown Nails Got You Hanging?

If you have an ingrown toenail, you can relate when I say the pain and discomfort is beyond aggravating. Trying to find comfortable shoes is sometimes impossible. But what do you do about an ingrown toenail? Do you try to cut it out with a toenail clipper? Will it be there forever? Some people are scared to seek medical attention because they think they will have to get their nail removed. Though sometimes this is necessary, it is rare that one will have to lose their entire nail.

An ingrown toenail is a nail that digs into the skin and causes pain, swelling, redness, and sometimes infection. It can be caused by genetics, trauma, or improper trimming. Stubbing your toe or dropping an object on your toe may result in an ingrown toenail. Many people cut their nails too short. This encourages the skin to surround the nail and the nail can then pinch the close confiding skin.

A podiatric physician can do a simple in office procedure to remove the offending nail border. The nail will continue to ingrow unless the matrix or the root of the nail is destroyed. When only the outside border is causing problems, the doctor can remove that portion of the nail and only kill the root of that area of the nail. Thus you will still have a nail but a small portion will be removed and will not grow back. Those concerned with cosmetics will be happy to know that the removal of the border of a nail often goes unnoticed by others when the condition is minor. If there is a serious infection present, the root of the nail will not be killed due to the reaction of the chemicals used with the infectious tissue. The nail border is removed and the injury is allowed to heal until the tissue is healthy to undergo chemical cauterization.

Though some need to undergo more invasive surgeries to remove the matrix, most have their problems solved by a simple 15 minute visit to the doctor. The most important thing to do is to keep your hands off your toenails. Do not try to pick at it or cut it because a small problem can become a big problem if you do not remove it correctly.

Heel Pain

The most common cause of heel pain is a condition called plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a ligament on the bottom of the foot that goes from the heel to the ball of the foot. The definition of-ITIS is disease or inflammation. So plantar fasciitis is inflammation or disease of the plantar fascia.

The plantar fascia ligament consists of 3 bands-the medial band in the arch of the foot, the middle band and the outside band. If you suffer from plantar fasciitis, you have inflammation and tightness usually of the inside or medial band in the arch of the foot.

If you have plantar fasciitis, you have a very tight ligament that acts like a rubberband. When you sit or sleep, the ligament tightens up and gets stiff. As soon as you get up and stand from sleeping or prolonged sitting, the arch in your foot drops, your foot lengthens and ultimately pulls that tight plantar fascia. This causes severe pain especially with the first steps in the morning after getting out of bed. That initial first step pain may ease up a little as you walk it out as the ligament stretches or loosens with less pain. The more pulling you get, the more inflammation develops and inflammation causes the pain.

There are numerous reasons why you can develop plantar fasciitis but a common source is due to overuse. The most common causes of heel pain from plantar fasciitis are unfavorable work conditions, exercise-induced or improper use of shoe gear. You are at-risk for heel pain, if you have an occupation involving a lot of walking and/or prolonged standing on hard floors. Nurses, dancers, athletes, runners, teachers, farm workers, construction works, just to name a few are prone to heel pain. Also if you are involved in a traumatic injury such as a car accident or fall at work, you are susceptible to having heel pain. If you recently started a new exercise or workout routine or change in your activity level, you may develop this heel pain condition. Even if you are a world-class athlete, you can 'overdo it' and develop plantar fasciitis. Finally, if you suffer from chronic low back pain, you can be prone to heel pain. Your back condition should be treated and monitored by a back specialist at the same time as seeing a podiatrist for the heel pain.

The symtoms of plantar fasciitis include pain in your arch, your heel or the entire bottom of your foot. If left untreated, your acute heel pain can develop into painful, long-term chronic heel pain.

If you have experienced these symtoms, it is crucial to see a foot and ankle specialist as soon as possible to prevent further pain and suffering. Diagnosis by a podiatric foot and ankle specialist will involve clinical evaluation and x-rays to further evaluate the heel bone and foot structure contributing to the pain. MRI is sometimes needed if a rupture of the ligament or other condition is suspected.

Good News! If you suffer from plantar fasciitis, it can be successfully treated without having surgery most of the time! Initially, the inflammation needs to be addressed and reduced first before the other treatments can work. Stretching and orthotics are very important but they can make your heel pain worse if there is a lot of inflammation and pain.

There are many ways to reduce the pain and inflammation such as Resting by reducing physical activities and 'babying' your foot, Icing your foot 20 minutes 2-3 times a day, Compression with a snug wrap or brace and Elevation of your foot. This can be summarized by the R.I.C.E. mnemonic. Also there are oral steroid and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications that can be prescribed by your podiatrist for pain relief. The most effective way to reduce the inflammation and pain by far is a cortisone steroid injection performed in the office of a podiatrist.

Comfortable, supportive shoe gear is important for heel pain relief in addition to wearing high-quality prefabricated or custom orthotics, which can be obtained by your podiatrist. A strapping or taping of the foot can also be performed by your podiatrist or therapist to support your arch. You should not walk barefoot not even around the house (not just socks) to aid in increased shock absorption and heel pain relief. Flip-flops and non-supportive shoes can make your heel pain worse.

Stretching the tight plantar fascia is imperative in the reduction of heel pain from plantar fasciitis. Stretching can be accomplished by using a combination of three different modalities: 1) home stretching exercises, 2) devices to stretch the ligaments and tendons called a night splint and day splint and 3) a formal program of physical therapy done 2-3 times a week by a trained professional.

If all else fails, there are a variety of other types of treatment for chronic, long-standing cases of plantar fasciitis.There is a new, non-invasive treatment of heel pain called the MLS laser. This laser therapy works by interacting with the tissues on a cellular level, speeding up metabolic activity to improve the nutrients crossing cell walls, promoting quick and healthy healing. This is done in the Willow Street Office of Henderson Podiatry with a series of 6 pain-free, quick 8-minute visits.

The last resort for heel pain relief is surgery to release the ligament. This minimally invasive procedure performed in a sterile operating room is called an Endoscopic Plantar Fasciotomy (EPF). It releases the tight medial band only of the plantar fascia.

Once the pain goes away, it can always return no matter what treatment you have had-even surgery. Maintenance to prevent the pain from coming back involves wearing a good, supportive pair of custom orthotics in your shoes, not walking barefoot and stretching the ligaments twice a day.

Choosing shoes for your children can play a critical role in their musculoskeletal development, including their posture.

In general, infants just learning to walk do not need shoes. Infants may go barefooted indoors, or wear only a pair of socks. This helps the foot grow normally and develop its muscles and strength as well as encourages the grasping ability of toes.

Once children are ready to walk as toddlers, their need for properly-fitted shoes is important. In general, a soft, pliable, roomy shoe, such as a sneaker, is ideal for all children. The toe box should provide enough space for growth and should be wide enough to allow the toes to wiggle. A finger's breadth of extra length will usually allow for about three to six months' worth of growth, though this can vary depending on your child's age and rate of growth.

Because high-top shoes tie above the ankle, they are recommended for younger children who may have trouble keeping their shoes on. Contrary to common belief, however, high-top shoes offer no advantages in terms of foot or ankle support over their low-cut counterparts.

Here are some tips when purchasing shoes for children:

  • Both feet should be measured every time you shop for new shoes since those little feet are growing. If, as is common, the feet are two different sizes, shoes should be fitted to the larger foot.
  • The child's foot should be sized while he or she is standing up with full weight-bearing.
  • There should be about one-half inch of space (or a thumb's width) between the tip of the toes and the end of the shoe. The child should be able to comfortably wiggle his or her toes in the shoe.
  • Have the child walk around the store for more than just a few minutes wearing the shoe with a normal sock. Ask the child if he or she feels any pressure spots in the shoe. Look for signs of irritation on the foot after the shoe is tested.
  • Put your hand inside the shoe and feel around for any staples or irregularities in the glue that could cause irritation. Examine where the inside stitching hits the foot.
  • Examine the shoe itself. It should have a firm heel counter (stiff material on either side of the heel), adequate cushioning of the insole, and a built-in arch. It should be flexible enough to bend where the foot bends at the ball of the foot, not in the middle of the shoe.
  • Never try to force your child's feet to fit a pair of shoes.
  • Shoes should not slip off at the heels. Children who have a tendency to sprain their ankles will do better with high-top shoes or boots.

Children who frequently remove shoes from their feet may be signaling some discomfort. Check your child's feet periodically for signs of too-tight shoes, such as redness, calluses or blisters, which will help you know when they've outgrown their shoes.

Remember that the primary purpose of shoes is to prevent injury. Shoes seldom correct children's foot deformities or change a foot's growth pattern. Casting, bracing, or surgery may be needed if a serious deformity is present. If you notice a problem, please contact our office to have your child's feet examined.